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What colour are my horse?

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vihar20032003
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What colour are my horse?

Postby vihar20032003 » August 24th, 2019, 2:34 pm

I have 5 horse but I don't know the colours. Please help me.

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Silverine
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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby Silverine » August 27th, 2019, 3:39 pm

vihar20032003 wrote:I have 5 horse but I don't know the colours. Please help me.


Wayward Aftershock is bay dun.

Icelandic Chains is silver grulla dun with appaloosa spotting.

Bobbin for Blade is bay dun with appaloosa snowflakes and minimal tobiano.

Whiskey my Haze is mealy bay dun.

2090726 is bay dun.

Standing for Canyon is gray on a chestnut base.

Fire Breathing Spray is gray on a bay base.

Ribbon On Feeling is gray on a bay base.
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vihar20032003
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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby vihar20032003 » August 27th, 2019, 3:51 pm

Thank you.
And how do you mark color genetics? Or is it worth marking?

Aliw1995
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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby Aliw1995 » August 28th, 2019, 5:44 am

vihar20032003 wrote:Thank you.
And how do you mark color genetics? Or is it worth marking?

What do you mean?

vihar20032003
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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby vihar20032003 » August 28th, 2019, 9:12 am

viewtopic.php?f=13&t=2158

There is a link. Here's how black hair, brown horse, etc. are denoted.
And I saw horses for sale that were written like (E / e) (At) or something like that.


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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby Silverine » August 28th, 2019, 1:41 pm

vihar20032003 wrote:http://www.horseworldonline.net/horse/profile/879392


Noting the base genetics isn't necessary, it's just something some of us use to help breed for specific colors. Each horse has two alleles (letters) for each color gene, one that it inherited from its mother and one that it inherited from its father. So when you see something like E/e that means that the horse has a dominant copy of that gene from one parent and a recessive from the other. When that horse breeds it can pass one or the other of those two alleles to its offspring, but not both.

For example, if you bred an E/E horse to a horse that was e/e you would always end up with an E/e baby because parent #1 could only pass down an E and parent #2 could only pass down an e.

To determine what genetics your horse has, you need to understand the basic color genetics. It also takes a bit of sleuthing, and understanding how the AC horses work.

Here's a run-down of the genes we see in the game:

Gray - G or g - Determines whether or not a horse is gray. A horse that is homozygous recessive (g/g) is not gray. A horse that is either heterozygous or homozygous dominant will always be gray (G/g or G/G). Gray covers all other colors, but does not appear at birth. Instead it spreads slowly throughout the horse's lifetime, usually starting with "goggles" around the eyes.

Extension - E or e - Determines whether or not a horse is red-based. A horse that is homozygous recessive (e/e) will always be red-based (chestnut, palomino, cremello, etc). A horse that is heterozygous or homozygous dominant will be black-based and may have bay, brown, or black as its base color (E/e or E/E).

Agouti - A, A+, At, or a - Determines whether a black-based horse is bay, brown or black. A red-based horse (e/e) will not be affected by the agouti gene. This gene is a little more complicated than extension or gray. A horse that is homozygous recessive (a/a) will be black-based. A horse that is At/At or At/a will be brown. A horse that is A+/A+, A+/At, or A+/a will be wild bay. A horse that is A/A, A/A+, A/At, or A/A will be bay.

Champagne - Ch or ch - Determines whether or not a horse expresses the champagne gene. A homozygous recessive (ch/ch) horse will not express champagne. A horse that heterozygous or homozygous dominant (Ch/ch or Ch/Ch) will display the champagne gene.

Dun - D or d - Determines whether or not a horse expresses the dun gene. A homozygous recessive (d/d) horse will not display dun. A horse that is heterozygous or homozygous dominant (D/d or D/D) will display the dun gene. Dun turns chestnut into red dun, bay into bay dun, brown into brown dun, and black into grullo/grulla.

Silver - Z or z - Determines whether or not a horse expresses the silver gene. A homozygous recessive (z/z) horse will not display the silver gene. A horse that is heterozygous or homozygous dominant (Z/z or Z/Z) will display the silver gene. The silver gene only affects black pigment, so a red-based horse will not show the silver gene even if it carries it.

Flaxen - F or f - Determines whether or not a horse expresses the flaxen gene. A homozygous or heterozygous dominant (F/f or F/F) horse will not display the flaxen gene. A horse that is homozygous recessive (f/f) with a chestnut base will display the flaxen gene. Flaxen is not apparent on black-based horses, or chestnut horses that carry visible cream or pearl dilutions.

Mealy - Pa or pa - Determines whether or not the horse displays the pangare gene. A homozygous recessive (pa/pa) horse will not display the pangare gene. A horse that is heterozygous or homozygous dominant (Pa/pa or pa/pa) will display the roan gene.

Roan - R or r - Determines whether or not a horse displays the roan gene. A homozygous recessive (r/r) horse will not display the roan gene. A horse that is heterozygous or homozygous dominant (R/r or R/R) will display the roan gene.

Tiger Eye - T or t - Determines whether or not a horse displays the tiger eye gene. A homozygous recessive horse (t/t) will not express tiger eye. A horse that is heterozygous dominant (T/t) will not display tiger eye unless it also has at least one copy of dominant champagne. A horse that is homozygous dominant (T/T) will always express the tiger eye gene.

Cream and Pearl - N, Cr, or prl - This is a dilution gene. It interacts with a horse's base color. A horse can be N/N, N/Cr, N/prl, Cr/Cr, Cr/prl, or prl/prl. A horse that is N/N or N/prl will show no visible effect to its coloration. A horse that is black and is N/Cr will show no visible effect to its adult color, though will appear slightly gray as a foal (this is called smoky black). N/Cr turns chestnut into palomino, bay into buckskin, and brown into smoky brown. Cr/Cr turns chestnut into cremello, bay into perlino, brown into brown cream, and black into smoky cream. Cr/prl turns chestnut into palomino pearl, bay into buckskin pearl, brown into brown cream pearl, and black into smoky pearl. And finally prl/prl turns chestnut into apricot, bay into bay pearl, brown into brown pearl, and black into black pearl.

Sooty - Sty or sty - A horse that is homozygous recessive (sty/sty) will not display the sooty gene. A horse that is heterozygous or homozygous dominant (Sty/sty or Sty/Sty) will display the sooty gene, though the degree of sootiness varies from horse to horse.


Some colors are easier to determine the genetics of than others. For example, if we grab a plain chestnut horse from the AC we know that its genetics are:
g/g e/e ?/? ch/ch d/d ?/? F/? r/r T/? N/?

The first set of question marks is the agouti gene. Because agouti does not affect a chestnut horse we have no way of knowing what agouti it is carrying. The second set of question marks is for the silver gene, for the same reason as agouti. Flaxen is labelled as F/? because the plain chestnut horse does not show flaxen, so it must have at least one dominant allele. But we don't know the second allele, because a single dominant would mask a single recessive. Tiger eye is labelled as T/? for the same reason. Cream/Pearl is labelled as N/? because it is clear that the plain chestnut horse does not have a cream gene, but could still possibly be hiding a pearl gene.

We can infer more based on the breed of the AC horse we chose. The AC horses only come in specific colors for certain breeds. Those colors are as follows:

Arabian - gray, chestnut, bay, brown, black - Arabians will NEVER carry champagne, dun, silver, mealy, roan, tiger eye, cream or pearl.

Belgian - chestnut, bay, black, flaxen, mealy, roan - Belgians will NEVER carry gray, champagne, dun, silver, tiger eye, cream, or pearl. They also can not be brown.

Caspian - chestnut, bay, brown, black, dun - Caspians will NEVER carry gray, champagne, silver, mealy, roan, tiger eye, cream, or pearl.

Forest Horse - chestnut, bay, brown, dun, mealy - Forest Horses will NEVER carry gray, champagne, silver, roan, tiger eye, cream, or pearl.

North African Barb - all except gray - Barbs can be absolutely color EXCEPT for gray.

Przewalski Horse - ALWAYS mealy bay dun

Shetland Pony - all except pearl or gray - Shetlands can be any color EXCEPT gray or pearl.

Tarpan - ALWAYS bay dun

Turkmene - chestnut, bay, brown, black, dun, cream - Turkmenes will NEVER carry gray, champagne, silver, mealy, roan, or pearl.
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vihar20032003
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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby vihar20032003 » August 28th, 2019, 1:47 pm

thank you

BlackOak2
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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby BlackOak2 » August 28th, 2019, 1:48 pm

vihar20032003 wrote:Thank you.
And how do you mark color genetics? Or is it worth marking?


And... Silverine has struck first!!!
I actually kind of missed being beaten by you, Silverine! :lol:

Anyway, I'm still posting. :D

********

It's only worth it, if YOU decide it is. I recommend learning your colors before you delve into the genetic coding. Genetic coding helps to determine what the foals will have when crossing parents, but it's easy enough to read the foals color when they blow it as a yearling.
For those unfamiliar with colors themselves, I don't recommend working with the genetic codes themselves unless you're specifically working with breeding a type of color. In that case, you'll still want to learn your colors first.

In the case of this one that you linked: id # 879392
This horse is being bred with confirmed genetic colors and as such, the foal coloration can be confirmed for certain characteristics before being matched with certain horses. In this horse's case, the brown color is the important color. Also, pangare is likely desired (also known as mealy). And to retain the brown color, chestnut is a no-go. So either double black, or single black is the important gene coding. Double black and single black is denoted as extension genes: E/E and E/e, whereas chestnut would be e/e.
So you see, getting into the coding side of genetics can be helpful, certainly, however, learning the straightforward colors first, certainly is the better and arguably easier point to tackle first.

Use the guide you linked as a first step toward learning the colors. We can help guide you to the differences of each, because on this game, we have such things as pseudo-blacks that are in fact chestnut horses. Like the example below.

Don't forget to check it out!
Quick Start Guide For Newbies
Link to additional information.
BlackOak2's Quick-Links

vihar20032003
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Joined: July 20th, 2019, 1:37 pm
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Re: What colour are my horse?

Postby vihar20032003 » August 28th, 2019, 1:50 pm

Thanks
It's very lot information. So I need the notes. xdd


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