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:-)

horsegirl008
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Joined: May 11th, 2020, 5:31 pm
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:-)

Postby horsegirl008 » January 30th, 2023, 7:34 pm

Working on training this little beauty! I'm trying training again - does anyone have any tips for me?

EclipticEnd
Posts: 1464
Joined: December 23rd, 2020, 7:21 pm
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Re: :-)

Postby EclipticEnd » January 31st, 2023, 2:44 am

horsegirl008 wrote:Working on training this little beauty! I'm trying training again - does anyone have any tips for me?

She's a very gorgeous Grulla (Black Dun / Grullo), one of my favorite colors in the game!

My advice for training would be:
  • Train Stamina before anything and your horse will train faster; I like to do Collection and Impulsion at a Walk in the Arena because it helps other stats along as well without raising fatigue. After that I do either Ground Poles for Tempo/Movement or Jumping Obstacles for Agility/Strength, then Lunge on the Flat for Speed. If anything's not maxed then I take the time and quickly max it once Speed is done.
  • You can start multiple horses at once and then freeze them as you begin to run out of time as they age and become more skilled, letting you focus on one while having others partially done. This is good if you have large groups of horses to do.
  • You can train one horse at a time if you don't have a lot of them to do; this'll let you use your grinder more and therefore get more turns and train longer.
  • Have a dedicated training pasture and a dedicated training barn. Keep the foals in the pasture. When they're old enough to eat 100% Weight Gain feed, move them into a barn if you need to raise temperaments. If you need to keep the temperaments down then keep them in the pasture and keep the fiber content of their diet higher than the sugar content. If you're doing any temperament besides High Strung then keep them in the pasture and mow the pasture down to 60% quality so that you can balance things easier without worrying that they're overeating or undereating.
  • If you can train before 3 years of age (or 4 for mares) then you're golden. You can use that horse in local shows up until breeding maturity if you want (3 years for colts, 4 years for fillies) in order to check their grinder potential, or you can stop there and use the younger age as a selling point. In general, having a horse done before it can be bred is a sign of a pretty good trainer, so long as they're trained decently up to 95%-99.9% in each stat; the higher the better.
  • When you want to do good photos, find something in the background of the photo area to line the horse up with. I get the horse zoomed in to fit the picture area without ears nor hooves being cut, then line the tail up with the edge of the barn when possible. The pictures come out pretty closely in the same area and it's more pleasant to look between them. This isn't necessarily a training tip but it is satisfying to have perfect or near-perfect pictures on a horse that you've trained, it just raises the quality of your work. An example is this horse. Notice how the image jumps between 0.13 years and 1 year, and then notice how the back hoof stays thereabouts in place in the pictures between 1 year and 2 years; that smooth transition's pretty nice and satisfying compared to the big jump of the first age and 1 year. Sadly I got him after the 0.13 age pictures were taken, but it is what it is.

horsegirl008
Posts: 627
Joined: May 11th, 2020, 5:31 pm
Visit My Farm

Re: :-)

Postby horsegirl008 » January 31st, 2023, 8:44 am

EclipticEnd wrote:
horsegirl008 wrote:Working on training this little beauty! I'm trying training again - does anyone have any tips for me?

She's a very gorgeous Grulla (Black Dun / Grullo), one of my favorite colors in the game!

My advice for training would be:
  • Train Stamina before anything and your horse will train faster; I like to do Collection and Impulsion at a Walk in the Arena because it helps other stats along as well without raising fatigue. After that I do either Ground Poles for Tempo/Movement or Jumping Obstacles for Agility/Strength, then Lunge on the Flat for Speed. If anything's not maxed then I take the time and quickly max it once Speed is done.
  • You can start multiple horses at once and then freeze them as you begin to run out of time as they age and become more skilled, letting you focus on one while having others partially done. This is good if you have large groups of horses to do.
  • You can train one horse at a time if you don't have a lot of them to do; this'll let you use your grinder more and therefore get more turns and train longer.
  • Have a dedicated training pasture and a dedicated training barn. Keep the foals in the pasture. When they're old enough to eat 100% Weight Gain feed, move them into a barn if you need to raise temperaments. If you need to keep the temperaments down then keep them in the pasture and keep the fiber content of their diet higher than the sugar content. If you're doing any temperament besides High Strung then keep them in the pasture and mow the pasture down to 60% quality so that you can balance things easier without worrying that they're overeating or undereating.
  • If you can train before 3 years of age (or 4 for mares) then you're golden. You can use that horse in local shows up until breeding maturity if you want (3 years for colts, 4 years for fillies) in order to check their grinder potential, or you can stop there and use the younger age as a selling point. In general, having a horse done before it can be bred is a sign of a pretty good trainer, so long as they're trained decently up to 95%-99.9% in each stat; the higher the better.
  • When you want to do good photos, find something in the background of the photo area to line the horse up with. I get the horse zoomed in to fit the picture area without ears nor hooves being cut, then line the tail up with the edge of the barn when possible. The pictures come out pretty closely in the same area and it's more pleasant to look between them. This isn't necessarily a training tip but it is satisfying to have perfect or near-perfect pictures on a horse that you've trained, it just raises the quality of your work. An example is this horse. Notice how the image jumps between 0.13 years and 1 year, and then notice how the back hoof stays thereabouts in place in the pictures between 1 year and 2 years; that smooth transition's pretty nice and satisfying compared to the big jump of the first age and 1 year. Sadly I got him after the 0.13 age pictures were taken, but it is what it is.

This is amazing!!! Thank you SO much!! Also thanks for the color...I knew liver chestnut wasn't right but didn't know what else to put down :lol:


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